Saturday, 30 August 2014

Lemon and Ginger Britain Biscuits


I just couldn't resist this Britain cookie cutter. Usually when you try intricate patterns with a biscuit they go really wrong. This is either because they rise too much and you can't make out what the shape was supposed to be in the first place, or they break, which these did. The lemon and ginger combination here is incredibly good and the two are definitely better together.

Monday, 25 August 2014

Socca




The panic that sets in when you go gluten free should never be underestimated. In a society where most of our convenience and comfort foods are based upon gluten grains, you find yourself craving everything you ever ate with wheat in it, from Yorkshire puddings and oven hot crispy croissants to just cooked crepes.

Sunday, 17 August 2014

Pissaladière

Whenever I crave a reminder of student life on la Cote d'Azur, I make Pissaladière. The bakeries in Nice serve it as a snack in huge delicious square slabs presented simply on baking parchment.  Across the border in San Remo, Italy, you'll find they add mozzarella, but not so en France. They love it just as it is and rightly so.

Friday, 15 August 2014

Chocolate and hazelnut black bean brownies

These chocolate hazelnut black bean brownies are ridiculously off the scale good. There's no way you can even tell they are vegan, gluten free, let alone full of beans!

Friday, 8 August 2014

Beetroot, coconut and lime soup

The English vegetable patch at this time of year makes for rich beetroot pickings, which is apt because this earthy, spicy soup delivers big flavours in spades.

What it's really like to do a detox

Two weeks before I’m due to step on a plane to do a six day detox, I receive an email. It’s from Jane, the yoga retreat’s hostess.

The note lists the food and drink I must cut out in order to prepare my body for the juice fast that I’ve signed up to. ‘Please omit caffeine, sugar, all processed food, meat, cow’s products, gluten and alcohol. We look forward to meeting you.’

Now if you’d shown me this a year earlier I would have winced. My sugar, dairy and gluten fuelled body could never go without her beloved chocolate, cheese, croissants and coffee. Never!

Or could it?


Friday, 25 July 2014

Turmeric omelette and things I like this week


Egg is one of those ingredients that is on my list of intolerances (dammit). However I find that as long as I don’t overdo the oeufs, occasionally I can tolerate them. A recipe that shows them right off in their freshest state is just the ticket, just like this turmeric omelette.

Saturday, 19 July 2014

My world top ten healthy blogs

 Green Kitchen Stories Baked Saffron Falafel
Green Kitchen Stories Saffron Baked Falafel
I thought it would be good to share some of the most useful blogs and posts I’ve found that are helping me to restore my health. Some of these cover food, while some are brilliant for learning the how’s and why’s of getting sick. They’ve certainly opened up a whole new world of learning for me, I hope you enjoy them too.

Sunday, 13 July 2014

3 reasons why I'm changing the blog name

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

I've been mulling over this for what seems like an age.

What I've learnt about restoring health with amazing food is no longer about being 'fussy'. So the time has come to create somewhere that I can share all that goodness with you. There have been oodles of fabulous suggestions on what to rename the blog. Thank you to each and every one of you who have made them. You are a creative (if a little crazy) bunch. In the end though, one kept shining through above all others...


What do you think?! I love it and hope you do too. As far as the name goes, here are my three great reasons why The Restored Kitchen has won through:

Saturday, 5 July 2014

Mum's Summer berry masterclass

We get the sweetest selection of plump summer berries at this time of year. I love to raid mum's garden (and jam cupboard) for black and red currants, strawberries and ruby red raspberries.
As a post war child (who looks impressively young for her years due to genes and yoga), mum also has an uncanny ability to preserve whatever excess fruit there might be.

Sunday, 29 June 2014

How to make zucchini pasta

If you tend to feel sluggish after your spaghetti, this zucchini 'pasta' dish will leave you with boundless energy from all its phytonutrient-rich greens.

As with any pasta, you've got to cook the veg just right (al dente is best) and serve it with a sumptuous sauce or you may as well stay at home; The pesto sauce is the key here to sending your taste buds into orbit. I also dressed this with some freshly steamed asparagus spears and extra pine nuts and sesame seeds to add some crunch as well as healthy fats.

Friday, 27 June 2014

Asparagus season and frittata

There’s an asparagus farm near us that has the freshest asparagus you could wish for. We go through legions of spears within the precious few weeks of the season.



Frittata is equally good hot or cold, so your gluten free picnics will never be the same again. It's also a brilliant vessel for any fresh summer greens (think peas, courgettes and herbs). My recipe uses mint, basil and thyme and it won’t last long. Enjoy!

Saturday, 21 June 2014

English summertime, the longest day

I've been busy taking shots around the farm and in the country to show you just how much I love England in the Summer.

It's light pretty much all day at the moment so I'm waking up early, which leaves plenty of time to capture and enjoy the fresh morning colours in the wood. Happy summertime!

Monday, 5 May 2014

Crispy sesame and ginger tofu

This is the perfect meal to cook up in a hurry when you get home from work. It's quick, easy to make, deliciously tasty and healthy too.

































The tofu, ginger and green veggies are much easier for your body to digest than a meat dish, so you should even find you sleep better after it too. Sesame seeds are full of magnesium which is also good for beating stress and tension.

Sunday, 16 February 2014

Happy carrot salad

Mood food, that's what this is. You know those recipes that give you a giggle just thinking about their name? Bubble & Squeak, Spotted Dick, Toad in the Hole...
It's a big claim I know, but somehow this simple little salad - with its sticky sesame, crunchy carrot and squidgy sultana and spicy surprise - scores every time.

Friday, 7 February 2014

Super green smoothie

If like me you've been wondering what all this juicing talk is all about anyway, let me let you into a secret: It's a game changer.
If you've been feeling sluggish in a morning, veggie juice is a great way to ease your body into the day ahead. Filled with phytonutrients, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, it's the perfect way to eat your veg quicker than you can say five a day.

Friday, 24 January 2014

Photoshoot - Miss Friday Bakery

A friend asked me to help her style and shoot for her bakery business. Brownies, glamorous Italian style meringues and romantic, indulgent wedding dessert tables: What's not to love?
You know when you just get it with someone - creatively that is? Well we had a blast. Hope you like the pics as much as we had fun taking them. 

Sunday, 29 December 2013

How to make raw chocolate, a picture post

Making raw chocolate is as easy as one, two, three, four. You can get the ingredients online or at good health food shops. It's packed full of antioxidants, none of which are wasted by overheating or roasting. Enjoy and Happy New Year!
Ingredients: 
100g raw cacao butter
10 tbsp raw cacao powder
2 tbsp agave syrup
Pinch salt
To flavour the chocolate:
Dried rose petals and rose syrup
Whole almonds, roasted

Method:
1. Melt the cacao butter gently in a bowl placed over a slowly simmering pan of water.
2. Once all the butter has melted, whisk in the raw cacao powder.
3. For the almond flavoured chocolates, place a whole roasted almond in each section of an ice cube tray.
4. Leave some mixture if you're making rose scented chocolate. Add in 2-3 tablespoons rose water and mix. Place some rose petals in the remaining sections of an ice cube tray. Freeze or chill for 10mins before knocking out of the tray to serve.

Monday, 23 December 2013

My Asian style salmon

If you’re feeling in need of some healthy winter nourishment, this Asian style salmon is just the ticket.

The meaty, poached salmon and its warming, spicy broth make a light but wholesome dish. Salmon is full of Omega 3 fats so it’s good for your skin too.

The broth is made with Thai ‘nam pla’, or fish sauce, which has a salty, punchy flavour that tastes like you’ve been slaving over stock for hours.

If you want a real detox, you can make this gluten and egg free by using soba noodles, which are made with buckwheat. Though rice vermicelli noodles or egg noodles work equally well.

Serves 4
4 small–medium salmon steaks

1 large carrot, peeled and grated

½ red onion, sliced finely

1 pint water

Large handful fresh parsley, chopped

Large handful fresh coriander, chopped

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

Knuckle fresh ginger, skinned and chopped into matchsticks or grated

3 tbsp Thai fish sauce

4 tbsp Tamari (gluten free) or normal soy sauce to taste

2-3 tbsp Swiss Bouillon (gluten free), or vegetable stock

1 pack Soba (buckwheat noodles) / 1 pack Rice vermicelli noodles.

Method:
1. Prepare all the chopped and grated ingredients. Heat up two large saucepans with about a pint of water in each on a medium heat (one is for the noodles, one is for the salmon and broth).

2. In saucepan 1, once the water is on a slow simmer, add half the garlic and ginger and the bouillon stock. Then add the salmon, making sure there’s enough water to cover the steaks. Add the noodles to saucepan 2 and bring to a boil..

3. Keep an eye on the noodles to make sure you don’t overcook them. When the salmon is nearly ready (depending on how you like it this should take about 4 minutes on a slow simmer), add in the rest of the fresh ingredients, and take off the heat. Drain the noodles and set aside. Add in the tamari/soy sauce and Thai fish sauce to taste.

Tuesday, 26 November 2013

Top tips for cooking with pheasant, from a Masterclass at jamie's hq

If you’re really serious about eating organic, wild and seasonal food, then pheasant should be on your shopping list.

As a farmer’s daughter, I grew up on pheasant casserole in Autumn and Winter. So when the invitation to Jamie Oliver’s HQ for a Pheasant Masterclass landed at my door, I couldn't resist.

Jamie’s trusted right hand men Gennaro Contaldo, Andy Appleton and Jon Rotherham were there to guide me and other keen bloggers through their ideas for this fabulous fowl.

Andy Appleton, Head Chef at Fifteen Cornwall 
So what did we learn? Here are their top tips for cooking with pheasant:

1.Pheasant either wants cooking very quickly or very slowly. Nothing in between.
2.Hen pheasants tend to have more fat on them and are generally more tender.
3.Try to get pheasants that haven’t hung for more than four days if you’re not keen on the gamey flavour.
4.Pheasant meat has B vitamins, potassium, readily absorbable iron and protein, zinc and vitamin C.
5. For cock pheasants, a top tip is to look at the spurs on their legs – if they’re big the pheasant is older and will need cooking longer (thanks Dad for this one).

Gennaro Contaldo, the animated Italian chef often seen with Jamie on the telly, did a delicious pheasant breast dish. The breast was duly bashed to tenderise it (although as he showed us it was incredibly tender to start with), then stuffed simply with half a red chilli, half a garlic clove with skin on and a verdant sprig of rosemary.

This one was all gluten and dairy free and so simple. The result was really delicious and you can easily imagine doing it after a busy day at work; in fact the bashing would be good relaxation.

He also showed us a trick to sear the meat while in the pan - you can use a brick but here he uses a bowl to make sure the meat is crispy.

Jon Rotherham, the head chef at Fifteen London, then went on to cook a pheasant and pork sausage with kale, pickled quince (delicious) and game chips.

Sicilian Caponata cooked by head chef at Fifteen Cornwall Andy Appleton was amazing. It included seasonal squash, soaked raisins and caramelised onion. It was an excellent fruity-sweet side to the pheasant. Because of this it would go equally well with other game, including venison.  

How do you cook your game? I'd love to know.

Thanks to Merlin, Jim and the chefs for a wonderful evening. If you'd like to get some great game recipes, try here. And if you want to find out where to buy game online, try here.

p.s. For some other pheasanty posts, try these blogs too:
The lovely Ren Behan and Layla Kazim also Rachel at The Food I Eat 
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